The Zionists are Coming! Panic at San Francisco State University

Rabab Adulhadi and other anti-Israel activists are in a panic as they face opposition.  During a recent San Francisco State University (SFSU) conference, there was a lot of hand-wringing over a petition to end SFSU’s partnership with the terrorist-friendly An-Najah University in the West Bank.

Click here to sign a petition calling for San Francisco State University (SFSU) to end its Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with An-Najah University in the West Bank. I

Rabab Abdulhadi is a SFSU professor, founding member of the US Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (BDS), and behind the  Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between her school and terrorist-friendly An-Najah University in the West Bank.

No longer will activists posing as academics to push an illiberal agenda go unopposed.

In the fevered imagination of the academic left, these are dark days at San Francisco State University (SFSU). Speakers at a two-day conference, “Rights and Wrongs: A Constitution and Citizenship Day Conference at San Francisco State University,” described a campus where a “corporatist” administration is at war with its faculty; Arab-American professors are afraid to walk alone on campus; ethnic student organizations are consigned to the dank student center basement; “Zionists” lie in wait to pounce on innocent, beleaguered proponents of “Palestine”; and “white supremacy” rules. All at one of the most radical universities in the nation.

Leading these lamentations was the director of SFSU’s Arab and Muslim Ethnicities and Diasporas Initiative (AMED), Rabab Abdulhadi, whose anti-Israel activism is coming back to haunt her. In addition to being named in a Lawfare Project (LP) lawsuit against SFSU alleging “anti-Semitism and overt discrimination against Jewish students,” she is at the heart of a Middle East Forum/Campus Watch campaign to end the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) she brokered between SFSU and An-Najah University, a hotbed of anti-Semitism and radicalism in the West Bank.

The conference was held on the top floor of the bustling Cesar Chavez Student Center—adorned by murals of Malcolm X and Edward Said—in spacious, light-filled Jack Adams Hall. A bulletin board near the entrance displayed a flyer calling for the removal of San Francisco’s Pioneer Monument, which it dubbed a “monument to white supremacy!” Conference programs featured a graphic of President Donald Trump’s silhouette balanced with a white fist on a scale of justice.

The audience of mostly students and small clusters of faculty ranged from a sparse fifty to sixty for the panel “Academic Freedom for Whom? Islamophobia, Palestine, and Campus Politics,” to around 250—many sitting on the floor after the seats quickly filled up—for “Muslims, Mexicans, and the Politics of Exclusion.”Full article at MEForum

Hamas And Fatah Sign Preliminary Reconciliation Deal Over Control Of Gaza Strip

Egyptian-brokered talks between rival Palestinian factions are being held under the direct auspices of Egyptian President  el-Sisi (the meeting was proposed and supported by President Trump.)

He [el-Sisi] wants a deal to permanently halt the movement of militants between Gaza and Sinai, where an Islamic State affiliate has damaged Egypt’s tourist industry as well as the broader recovery El-Sisi wants to portray. Ending the rift in Palestinian ranks could also ease Gaza’s suffering and bolster their hand in future peace talks with Israel. Put together, they point to an assertive Egypt looking to reclaim its role as a regional powerhouse.

There’s the “sense of wanting to re-establish Egyptian leadership and foreign policy activism — putting Egypt back in its rightful place,” said Michael Wahid Hanna, a senior fellow at the Century Foundation in Washington. Bloomberg

Previous attempts at reconciliation between the two sides were unveiled with fanfare and declarations of unity, only to quickly end.

Pressure on Hamas

“The Egyptians have certainly put a lot of pressure on Hamas, but they’re under no illusions about the possibility of this agreement’s early demise,” Eran Lerman, a lecturer at Shalem College in Jerusalem and a former member of Israel’s National Security Council, said. Bloomberg

In June, Egpyt put pressure on Hamas to distance itself from Iran.  Egypt also demanded that Hamas not express support for Qatar.

Relations between Iran and Hamas cooled due to differences over the conflict in Syria.  In 2017, Iran agreed in principle to renew its funding for the Hamas terror group, stated the Times of Israel.

International largesse from Europe, American, NGOs… goes to the Palestinian Authority.   It is supposed to use the money for all the Palestinians including those in Gaza, which it uses it uses to assert authority in Gaza.

Beginning in April and during the summer the PA stopped paying the Gaza utility bills to Israel.  The PA also cut the pay by 30 percent of Gaza government officials and workers who do not work but have remained on the payroll.

Fatah then sent a stark message to Hamas: Reconcile and allow the Palestinian Authority to assume control in Gaza, or manage alone.

“Part of this is Abbas showing he is in control and he is the boss,” said Mahdi Abdul Hadi, director of the Palestinian Academic Society for the Study of International Affairs, an independent research institute in East Jerusalem. “The message to Hamas is: If you want to govern it, take it.”  NYTimes

Hamas holds few cards.   Egypt keeps the Rafah border crossing in Gaza mostly closed.   Qatar reduced funding to Hamas and Iran has only discussed the renewal of funding.

Preliminary  Deal

Hopes for the agreement, signed under the watchful eye of Egyptian intelligence, were tempered by the knowledge that many previous Palestinian initiatives have failed. Yet there is optimism that this time may be different, partly because the stakes are so much higher.

Hamas, which controls Gaza and has fought Israel three times, said it was ready to cede control of Gaza’s borders and allow the rival Palestinian Authority to effectively take over the day-to-day running of the territory.

Continue reading “Hamas And Fatah Sign Preliminary Reconciliation Deal Over Control Of Gaza Strip”