Declassified Cable: Pakistani Intelligence Agency Funded Deadly Attack On CIA Personnel

Suspected Haqqani network insurgents are presented to the media in Kabul in May 2013.
Suspected Haqqani network insurgents are presented to the media in Kabul in May 2013.

Pakistan, a major recipient of U.S. military funding directly financed the suicide bombing that killed seven CIA employees at Camp Chapman in Khost, Afghanistan on December 30, 2009 alleges a declassified U.S. intelligence document.

It was the deadliest attack sustained by the CIA in 26 years, and according to a just-declassified U.S. intelligence cable, Pakistan’s military intelligence agency paid a notorious Islamist terror group $200,000 to carry it out.

State Department spokesman John Kirby, asked about the claim Thursday, declined to “speak about intelligence matters.”

The shock allegation – that Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) Directorate financed the Haqqani network’s suicide bombing that killed seven CIA employees at Camp Chapman in Khost, Afghanistan on December 30, 2009 – is contained in a Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) document, marked secret and dated February 6 of the following year.

It was obtained, in heavily-redacted form, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request by the National Security Archive, an independent non-governmental research institute at The George Washington University. CNSNews

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