San Francisco Has The Lowest Percentage Of Children Of Any Major U.S. City

“Everybody talks about children being our future,” said Norman Yee, a member of San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors. “If you have no children around, what’s our future?” NYTimes

Since the 1960s the number of children in San Francisco has gradually declined.

Raising children is on the agenda for Daisy Yeung, a high school science teacher, and Slin Lee, a software engineer. But just not in San Francisco. “When we imagine having kids, we think of somewhere else,” Mr. Lee said. “It’s starting to feel like a no­kids type of city.” NYTimes

Today San Francisco has the lowest percentage of children of any of the largest 100 cities in America, according to census data.

As an urban renaissance has swept through major American cities in recent decades, San Francisco’s population has risen to historical highs and a forest of skyscraping condominiums has replaced tumbledown warehouses and abandoned wharves.

At the same time, the share of children in San Francisco fell to 13 percent, low even compared with another expensive city, New York, with 21 percent. Chicago, 23 percent of the population is under 18 years old, which is also the overall average across the United States. NYTimes

Demographic and Poverty Trends in San Francisco sfhsa

San Francisco population of dogs is roughly the same number of children.

“Sometimes I’ll be walking through the city and I’ll see a child and think, ‘Hey, wait a second. What are you doing here?’” said Courtney Nam, who works downtown at a tech start­up. “You don’t really see that many kids.”

There is one statistic that the city’s natives have heard too many times. San Francisco, population 865,000, has roughly the same number of dogs as children: 120,000. In many areas of the city, pet grooming shops seem more common than schools. NYTimes

There are a number of factors for the decline: public schools, high housing cost, tech culture, homosexual population, and worldview.

In an interview last year, Peter Thiel, the billionaire Silicon Valley investor and a co­founder of PayPal, described San Francisco as “structurally hostile to families.” Prohibitive housing costs are not the only reason there are relatively few children. A public school system of uneven quality, the attractiveness of the

Prohibitive housing costs are not the only reason there are relatively few children. A public school system of uneven quality, the attractiveness of the less foggy suburbs to families, and the large number of gay men and women, many of them childless, have all played roles in the decline in the number of children, which  began with white flight from the city in the 1970s. The tech boom now reinforces the notion that San Francisco is a place for the young, single and rich.  NYTimes

A cultural and worldview shift is shown in San Francisco with the decline of children in the population.  A secular worldview that redefines the family and human sexuality – marriage, sex, and reproduction.

 

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