In First Year Of Legalization Canada Reports Nearly 2,000 Assisted Suicide Deaths

People are to be cared for not killed.

The data from Health Canada’s second Interim Report on assisted dying states that there were 1982 reported assisted deaths (1,977 reported euthanasia deaths and five reported assisted-suicide deaths) in the first year (June 17, 2016-June 30, 2017) since legalization. (Image via Euthanasia Prevention Coalition/via LifeSiteNews.com)

There were 167 reported euthanasia deaths in Québec prior to the federal government legalizing assisted death, therefore as of June 30 there have been (1,982 + 167) 2,149 reported assisted deaths in Canada.

Canadian governments have established a self-reporting system, meaning the doctor who carries out the death is the same doctor who reports the death (no oversight of the law) therefore it is possible that under-reporting and abuse of the law occurs. Based on the first Québec government euthanasia report 14 percent of the assisted deaths did not comply with the law.

There have been several stories indicating that there are problems with Canada’s euthanasia law. For instance, Candice Lewis was pressured by doctors to die by euthanasia. Now she is feeling much better.

In late September 2016, Dr. Will Johnston reported on two British Columbia deaths that appear to abuse the euthanasia law.

In November, I was contacted by a man who stated that his Aunt, who died by euthanasia, may only have had a bladder infection.

Canada’s euthanasia law does not protect conscience rights for medical professionals. The Coalition for HealthCare and Conscience launched a legal challenge to the Ontario College of Physicians policy that forces physicians, who oppose killing, to “effectively refer” their patients to a physician who will kill. LifeSite

Updated-Insurance Company Denied Her Chemo Treatment. But It Covered Drugs For Suicide.

Closeup Money rolled up with pills, expensive healthcare
Update:

Terminally ill mom who was refused access to chemotherapy but told she could get suicide drug, she put pressure on the insurance company and threatened to tell her story. Insurance bosses then approved the drug which may buy her more time.

Packer is determined to spend as much time with her children aged between seven and 13. DailyMail

In California, Stephanie Packer who has a terminal illness, instead of receiving medical assistance was instead offered accelerated death.

While life-affirming palliative care remains an expensive medical cost, Packer recommended that more energy and resources fund hospice care, instead of making death the cheaper option.

“We can start to fix our broken health care system, and people will start to live instead of feeling like they have to choose to die.”

Stephanie Packer cherishes every moment with her husband and four children. Living with a terminal illness in Orange, California, her goal is “to do everything I can to have one more second with my kids.”

When assisted suicide legislation was officially passed in California in 2016, Packer experienced the ultimate slap in the face: her insurance company denied the coverage of critical chemotherapy treatment that her doctors recommended for her condition.

Her insurance would, however, cover end-of-life drugs for just $1.20.

“It was like someone had just hit me in the gut,” said Packer, who shared her story in the new documentary, Compassion and Choice Denied

Particularly concerning: the insurance company had initially suggested that they would cover the chemotherapy drugs. It was one week after assisted suicide was legalized that they sent Packer a letter saying they were denying coverage. Despite multiple appeals, they continued to refuse.

“As soon as this law was passed, patients fighting for a longer life end up getting denied treatment, because this will always be the cheapest option… it’s hard to financially fight,” Packer said in the documentary. CNA

“Compassion and Choice DENIED explores the effects efforts to legalize physician assisted suicide have on those who are living with terminal illness but who do not want “aid in dying.” The film features Stephanie, a wife and mother living with a terminal diagnosis. She has experienced first-hand the dangerous effects of California’s recent legalization of physician assisted suicide.”

Because of how important this issue is the short film has been posted to Youtube.