Tag Archives: August 21st Total Solar Eclipse

Historic August 21st Eclipse

It will cross the US from west to east, beginning at Lincoln Beach, Oregon.

On August 21st, a total solar eclipse will pass from coast-to-coast through the continental United States for the first time in nearly a century.

The event will be visible to millions of people as it crosses through 14 states, with the path of totality stretching from Lincoln Beach, Oregon, to Charleston, South Carolina.

However, forecasters say there may be a problem that scuppers the plans of millions – cloud…

‘We found that the coasts could be susceptible to cloudier conditions and that increased cloud cover may be possible as the eclipse travels across the country east of the Mississippi River.

At its totality, the sun will be completely blocked by the moon, leaving only the ‘pearly white rays’ of its elusive corona visible to the naked eye – but, even in areas set to experience the longest duration of totality, the sun will only be fully covered for less than three minutes.

To be sure you don’t miss out on the rare event, scientists have revealed many ways to prepare, from what time the eclipse will pass through your city, to when you should put on your safety glasses. 

While entirety of the event will only be seen along the 70-mile-wide path of totality, even viewers outside the range will be able to see a partial solar eclipse.

The latter will be visible all across North America, and even in parts of South America, Africa, and Europe, according to NASA

There, the total solar eclipse will begin at 10:16 a.m. (PDT).

The phenomenon will then cross through the US over the course of roughly an hour and a half, passing through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and North and South Carolina.

It will end near Charleston, South Carolina, at 2:48 p.m. (EDT), according to NASA.

While the totality itself will last just a few minutes, the eclipse  – from start to finish – will span more than an hour as the moon moves in and out of the sun’s path, giving rise to a series of crescents along the way.

It’s not enough just to know where to see it, though.

Viewers must also be prepared with the proper gear to protect their eyes during the event. DailyMail

Video:  NASA EDGE Solar Eclipse2017 Preview

Online:  Main NASA site for 2017 August 21 eclipse