Diabetes-Related Amputations Up By A Shocking 31 Percent in California – And San Diego More Than Twice That

In the U.S. foot and leg amputations for diabetics have been declining since the mid-1990s.   Even as rates of the disease were rising in the United States, fewer foot and leg amputations were being performed on people with diabetes.

“It’s impossible to pinpoint a specific reason for the drop in major amputations. We do know that better foot and ankle treatment is a part of it though,” stated Dr. Phinit Phisitkul, an assistant clinical professor at the University of Iowa department of orthopedics and rehabilitation. MedicalExpress

Between 2009 and 2014 the CDC noticed an increase of 27 percent nationally in the rate of amputations among people with diabetes.  Previously, the numbers had been declining.

In California the numbers are shocking  – diabetic amputation increased statewide more than 31%.  There has been an increase by 66.4% in San Diego County of diabetic amputations.

Clinicians are amputating more toes, legs, ankles and feet of patients with diabetes in California – and San Diego County in particular – in a “shocking” trend that has mystified diabetes experts here and across the country.

Statewide, lower-limb amputations increased by more than 31 percent from 2010 to 2016 when adjusted for population change. In San Diego County, the increase was more than twice that: 66.4 percent.

Losing a foot, ankle or especially a leg robs patients of their independence, hampers their ability to walk and makes them more vulnerable to infection. It also can shorten their lives.

This trend, which inewsource documented with state hospital data, is one physicians, surgeons and public health officials are at a loss to explain, though many have theories.

Edward Gregg of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the California numbers are worrisome.

Public health officials consider amputations to be an important indicator of a region’s diabetes care because diabetes and its complications can be prevented, said Gregg, chief of epidemiology and statistics for the CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation.

“If we see it going down, then it’s a good sign, because so many aspects of good diabetes care are in theory affected. And when you see it going up, that’s a concern,” he said…

The increase also could be attributed to inadequate attention to diagnosing and managing the disease in some populations, he said, adding that in some populations, there may be less attention to diagnosing and managing the disease.

But those reasons together don’t explain the stark increase in such a short period of time, he said.

The CDC and other experts are stumped at the increase of diabetic amputations in California.  There are many theories – aging population, more people being diagnosed, managing the disease in some populations…

Lack of covered treatment

Jonathan Labovitz, a Pomona foot and ankle surgeon and podiatry researcher affiliated with the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, said some of the blame likely can be traced to 2009 when the state stopped paying for outpatient podiatry services for patients under Medi-Cal, California’s health program for the poor.

State health officials confirmed that Medi-Cal excluded podiatry services as of July 1, 2009 because of the state’s budget shortfall, but said podiatry services are covered when provided by primary care physicians, federally qualified health centers, rural health centers and tribal clinics, and are covered by some Medi-Cal managed care plans. State officials declined to comment on whether the change resulted in an increase in amputations.

Read full article at CBS8

Sarcopoterium Spinosum: Grows Mostly In Israel, A Beneficial Effect For Diabetes

Human clinical studies will be launched soon.

Its Hebrew name, sira kotzanit (thorny burnet). It’s a lowly and humble plant that requires a lot of sunlight, which is why the Land of Israel is practically covered in it, especially in desert areas. Its uses in the past have been as brooms and as drinking hole covers, to filter out the dirt. Now this is going to change radically, as Sarcopoterium Spinosum, the sole species within the genus Sarcopoterium, is going to save millions of lives.

In a few years, of course — for the moment this is still just the brainchild of Dr. Tovit Rosenzweig, of the Department of Molecular Biology and the Department of Nutrition Sciences, and Head of the Master’s Program in Biology at Ariel University – the only Israeli university in Samaria.

Dr. Rosenzweig’s research has led to the development of a drug based on Sarcopoterium Spinosum that could change the lives of more than 200 million diabetes sufferers worldwide, Walla reported Wednesday.

“In diabetes, the body’s ability to balance blood sugar is impaired,” says Dr. Rosenzweig. “Homeopathic medicine recognizes the virtues of Sarcopoterium Spinosum. We are investigating the plant’s effects using modern scientific methods.”

“The results of the studies we have done so far are impressive, showing a good effect on blood sugar levels,” she notes. “Insulin sensitivity is improving and we are about to launch the first clinical trial in humans.”

According to an Israeli homeopathic website, a German mission visited Syria in 1926 to investigate a rumor about Bedouins who cure diabetes using tea made from the thorny bush. A later research by Hebrew University Department of Pharmaceuticals confirmed those findings, locating the active ingredient in the root and bark of the plant.

Israeli residents looking for the cure today can go simply outside and find a bush of sira kotzanit practically everywhere in the countryside, make an extraction using the roots and drink it. Disclaimer: Of course, we do not recommend that you actually do that, we are not a medical publication nor do we have the authority to recommend homeopathic or other cures.  JewishPress