In First Year Of Legalization Canada Reports Nearly 2,000 Assisted Suicide Deaths

People are to be cared for not killed.

The data from Health Canada’s second Interim Report on assisted dying states that there were 1982 reported assisted deaths (1,977 reported euthanasia deaths and five reported assisted-suicide deaths) in the first year (June 17, 2016-June 30, 2017) since legalization. (Image via Euthanasia Prevention Coalition/via LifeSiteNews.com)

There were 167 reported euthanasia deaths in Québec prior to the federal government legalizing assisted death, therefore as of June 30 there have been (1,982 + 167) 2,149 reported assisted deaths in Canada.

Canadian governments have established a self-reporting system, meaning the doctor who carries out the death is the same doctor who reports the death (no oversight of the law) therefore it is possible that under-reporting and abuse of the law occurs. Based on the first Québec government euthanasia report 14 percent of the assisted deaths did not comply with the law.

There have been several stories indicating that there are problems with Canada’s euthanasia law. For instance, Candice Lewis was pressured by doctors to die by euthanasia. Now she is feeling much better.

In late September 2016, Dr. Will Johnston reported on two British Columbia deaths that appear to abuse the euthanasia law.

In November, I was contacted by a man who stated that his Aunt, who died by euthanasia, may only have had a bladder infection.

Canada’s euthanasia law does not protect conscience rights for medical professionals. The Coalition for HealthCare and Conscience launched a legal challenge to the Ontario College of Physicians policy that forces physicians, who oppose killing, to “effectively refer” their patients to a physician who will kill. LifeSite

Canada Is Harvesting The Organs Of Euthanasia Patients

The dark world of euthanasia.

A recent push in Canada to encourage euthanasia patients to donate their organs appears to be working.

In Ontario, the first province to report data, 26 people who died by lethal injection decided to donate tissue or organs since the Medical Aid in Dying Act (MAID) came into effect last June, according to the National Post. A total of 388 people have chosen to die by lethal injection in Ontario, over half of the 744 total Canadians who have been euthanized.

Proponents of linking organ harvesting to euthanasia point to the shortage of organ transplants readily available and the lower cost associated with euthanasia than with end-of-life care.

Canadian ethicists Julie Allard and Marie-Chantal Fortin encouraged the joining of euthanasia with organ harvesting in an article in December’s Journal of Medical Ethics.

But even supporters acknowledge the potential unintended consequences. Allard and Fortin warned in their article that encouraging organ harvesting could put pressure on those diagnosed with terminal illness to consider assisted suicide as an alternative sense of purpose.

Jennifer Chandler, professor of policy and ethics at the University of Ottawa, said linking euthanasia with organ harvesting “might create pressure to continue with the MAID” and make it hard for terminally ill people to change their minds about taking their lives.

“The people in the euthanasia lobby want people to think of it as a social good,” Alex Schadenberg, director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, said. Once people accept euthanasia, the logical next step is organ harvesting, Schadenberg noted. He pointed to the worldwide push for organ harvesting not hours or minutes after someone’s heart stops, but while their heart is still beating.

The practice — which supporters argue will allow the organ to better graft into recipient — is being considered in Belgium and is legal in the Netherlands if patients are brain-damaged and their death seems imminent. BPNews