Iceland’s First Pagan Temple To Norse gods Since Viking Age Ready In Late 2018

In Iceland, paganism is going mainstream in that society with the building of a pagan temple to honor the old Norse gods.  Iceland’s first pagan temple in 1000 years.  The pagan temple will overlook Reykjavik, Iceland’s capital.

 The Ásatrú temple in Öskjuhlíð in Reykjavik will be ready in the latter part of next year. There’s been a break in the construction of the temple but construction will begin again in January.

The building was supposed to be ready by next summer but construction had proved more complicated than previously thought.  This was confirmed by head chieftain Hilmar Örn Himarsson of the Ásatrú society of Iceland to Morgunblaðið.  IcelandMonitor

“In that day men will cast away to the moles and the bats
Their idols of silver and their idols of gold,
Which they made for themselves to worship,”  Isaiah 2:20

There have been no temples to the Norse gods in Iceland for over 900 years, but in 2015, the Ásatrú Society, re-established in 1972, began construction on a modern temple in Reykjavík, the capital of Iceland. It is expected to be ready for use sometime this summer at a final cost of around $1.25 million.

The pagan religion is making a comeback in Iceland, necessitating the construction of the new facility. Established 45 years ago by farmer Sveinbjörn Beinteinsson, the Ásatrú Society initially had 12 members. According to the National Bureau of Statistics in Iceland, there were 2,382 members in 2014; today there are 3,583 members.

“I think more people are seeing what we’re doing and they like it,” said Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson, current High Chieftain and director of the Ásatrú movement, in an interview in Iceland Monitor. “We do not recruit members. We just encourage people to come if they are interested.  Our ceremonies are open to everyone.”

There may be another reason for the rise in Ásatrú popularity. Unlike the mainstream Lutheran church that most Icelanders attend, the Icelandic version of neo-paganism promotes same-sex weddings.

“There has been a massive increase in demand for same-sex wedding ceremonies in the last year, an explosion really,” Hilmarsson said in an interview in Gay Iceland, noting that many foreign citizens visit Iceland specifically to be married in his pagan service. “The pagan belief is very inclusive and we are open to all opinions, so we welcome all, gay or straight, Icelandic or foreign.”  BreakingNewsIsrael

Online:  A religion that speaks to people today – a video interview with the head chieftain about the temple.

Iceland Eradicating Down Syndrome By Aborting Every Baby Who Had It

A CBS news story headline:   “What kind of society do you want to live in?”: Inside the country where Down syndrome is disappearing

How was this accomplished?   Genetic science?  DNA research?  No.
Iceland is “disappearing” Down Syndrome babies by abortion.  Instead of treating the genetic disorder, Iceland is eliminating the person.

The CBS report begins:  “Few countries have come as close to eradicating Down syndrome births as Iceland.  Since prenatal screening tests were introduced in Iceland in the early 2000s, the vast majority of women — close to 100 percent — who received a positive test for Down syndrome terminated their pregnancy.”

Just a handful of children with Down syndrome have been born in Iceland in the past decade. Two are born each year, on average, but the rest are killed in the womb. For most of the children who were born, their mothers decided not to have prenatal screening tests.

This deadly discrimination against babies with disabilities is a problem in countries across the world, not just Iceland. In 2014, the Danish government reported 98 percent of unborn babies who tested positive for Down syndrome were aborted. CBS reports the rate in France was 77 percent in 2015, 90 percent in the United Kingdom and 67 percent in the U.S. between 1995 and 2011. Some put the rate even higher in the United States, but it is difficult to determine the exact number because the U.S. government does not keep detailed statistics about abortion.

In many of these countries, late-term abortions are legal in cases of fetal anomalies, such as Down syndrome. The UK, for example, prohibits abortions after 24 weeks but allows wide exceptions for late-term abortions involving fetal anomalies.

Iceland hospital counselor Helga Sol Olafsdottir does not see any problem with the fact that so many women are having their unborn babies aborted because of Down syndrome. This systematic discrimination is simply a “woman’s choice” in her mind.  LifeNews

This is happening to Down syndrome babies for only one reason. Unlike the rest of the handicapped community, those with Down syndrome do not have a voice, do not organize, do not express the kind of outrage that makes for good teeeveeee. This population is completely innocent, guileless, helpless and at our mercy — a fact that makes their “disappearing” all the more demonic. DailyWire

Icelandic Leftist Poisons Robert Spencer Of Jihad Watch

Awful.  Wicked.

Last Thursday, I gave a lecture on the jihad threat at the Grand Hotel in Reykjavik, Iceland. Shortly thereafter, a young Icelandic Leftist registered his disapproval of what I said by poisoning me.

It happened after the event, when my security chief, the organizers of the event, and Jihad Watch writer Christine Williams, who had also been invited to speak, went with me to a local restaurant to celebrate the success of the evening.

At this crowded Reykjavik establishment, I was quickly recognized. A young Icelander called me by name, shook my hand, and said he was a big fan. Shortly after that, another citizen of that famously genteel and courteous land also called me by name, shook my hand, and said “F**k you.”

We took that marvelous Icelandic greeting as a cue to leave. But the damage had already been done. About fifteen minutes later, when I got back in my hotel room, I began to feel numbness in my face, hands, and feet. I began trembling and vomiting. My heart was racing dangerously. I spent the night in a Reykjavik hospital.

What had happened quickly became clear, and was soon confirmed by a hospital test: one of these local Icelanders who had approached me (probably the one who said he was a big fan, as he was much closer to me than the “F**k you” guy) had dropped drugs into my drink. I wasn’t and am not on any other medication, and so there wasn’t any other explanation of how these things had gotten into my bloodstream.

For several days thereafter I was ill, but I did get to Reykjavik’s police station and gave them a bigger case than they have seen in good awhile. The police official with whom I spoke took immediate steps to identify and locate the principal suspects and obtain the restaurant’s surveillance video.

Iceland is a small country. Everyone knows everyone else. And so as it happened, I was quickly able to discover the identity, phone number, and Facebook page of the primary suspect, the young man who claimed he was a “big fan.” I don’t intend to call him.  Icelandic police will be contacting him soon enough, if they haven’t done so already.

However, I did look at his Facebook page, and as I expected, I saw nothing that might indicate that he really was a “big fan” of my work, or that he held any views out of the mainstream — which is, courtesy of Iceland’s political and media elites, dominated entirely by the Left. JihadWatch

Iceland Prime Minister Resigns

Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson
Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson

The first, with more  probably to follow, from the fallout of the massive corruption exposed in the Panama Papers.

The Panama Papers leaks apparently resulted in a political casualty Tuesday when Icelandic Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson resigned.

Gunnlaugsson had been under intense pressure to step down since leaked documents hacked from a Panamanian law firm revealed his links to an offshore company, triggering mass protests in the capital.

Iceland’s Capital To Change Ban On Israeli-made Goods

Photo by Marco Bellucci
Photo by Marco Bellucci

Reykjavik Mayor Dagur B. Eggertsson issued a statement that the City Council would cancel its previously announced boycott of Israel products.

“I have stated that it should have been made much clearer in the text, although that’s what we had in mind. I will suggest to the City Council that the motion the way it reads now be withdrawn while we discuss the next steps and how to present it. … I must admit that I’m angry at myself for not having done this the way I wanted.”

The Mayor expressed surprise at the negative reaction to the boycott, “I did expect a reaction, but nothing like this. The reaction this decision has received appears to be much more intense than when Iceland recognized the state of Palestine.” The capital of Iceland has not given up and plans to modified its boycott of Israeli resolution to include only products from over the Green Line. YNet

Op-Ed: Iceland’s Anti-Semitism is Not New, It Just Resurfaced

This country of 328,000 people has enough anti-Semitic acts in its history to rival any other nation.
Recent developments in Iceland fit well in the long history of that country’s anti-Semitism. Last week, the left wing majority on the Reykjavik municipal council decided on a boycott of all Israeli products. In view of the protests, the city’s mayor now wants to replace it with a boycott of “settlement” goods. Read at Arutz Sheva-IsraelNationalNews

Iceland’s Capital Votes to Adopt Boycott of Israeli Products

Reykjavik photoUpdate:  Iceland Foreign Ministry makes clear Reykjavik’s boycott decision ‘doesn’t match state policy,’ Urdur Gunnarsdóttir, a spokesperson of the ministry stated,  “the city council of Reykjavik is one of 74 regional authorities in Iceland. As in other municipalities, the city council of Reykjavik is free to draft policy relating to its local issues, including its purchasing policy, as long as it is in accordance with national legislation.”

However, she said the decision to boycott Israel “doesn’t match the foreignpolicy of Iceland.” IsraelNationalNews

Reykjavik, Iceland’s capital city, has voted to adopt a boycott of Israeli products. A full boycott would mean giving up technology (computers,cell phones…), medical technology, etc.

Council members said the boycott was a symbolic act demonstrating the Icelandic capital’s support for Palestinian statehood and condemnation of Israel’s “policy of apartheid.”

Israel’s Foreign Ministry condemned the move, and, in an apparent reference to Iceland’s status as a hotbed of volcanic activity, said “a volcano of hatred spews forth from the Reykjavik city council building.

“For no reason or justification, except hatred for its own sake, calls of boycotting the state of Israel are heard,” the Foreign Ministry said in a statement. “We hope someone in Iceland will come to their senses and end the one-sided blindness fielded against Israel, the only democracy in the Middle East.”

One local attorney may step up to the task, the Icelandic news site, visir.is reported. Einar Gautur Steingrímsson claimed that the motion violates the Icelandic constitution.

“This is as illegal as refusing to do business with red haired people and it makes no difference whether they justify their decision with references to some alleged actions by the Israelis,” he told the website. TimesOfIsrael

Photo by Marco Bellucci

Icelandic Pagans To Build First Temple To Norse gods Since Viking Age

ThorgodofthunderModern paganism has increased in Europe. The growth of paganism in Europe corresponds with the decline of Christianity.  In England there is reportedly a quarter of a million who say they practice pagan religions. The Guardian reports, “Membership in [Norse paganism group] Ásatrúarfélagið has tripled in Iceland in the last decade to 2,400 members last year, out of a total population of 330,000, data from Statistics Iceland showed.”  In Reykjavik, Iceland’s capital, construction will start this month building the first temple to the Norse gods since the Viking age.

The worship of the old Norse gods in Scandinavia gave way to Christianity about 1,000 years ago. The old gods and goddesses disappeared over time but some did not quite go away, but only withdrew into the shadows and a modern version of Norse paganism is increasing in popularity in Iceland.

Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson, the high priest of ‘Asatruarfelagid’ an association that promotes Norse paganism, explained the modern manifestation of Norse paganism differs some from the past versions.   “I don’t believe anyone believes in a one-eyed man who is riding about on a horse with eight feet. We see the stories as poetic metaphors and a manifestation of the forces of nature and human psychology.”

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