The Six Commandments? UK Christians Feel Four Of The Ten Are No Longer Important

“See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the elemental spiritual forces of this world rather than on Christ.” Colossians 2:8

The impact on religious belief by a liberal society and secular humanism.

“To accept the liberal settlement is to accept institutions, ideas and practices whose influence over our lives and our children’s lives will be broad, deep and relentless: family life, religious life and paradigmatically private associations take on the colour of liberal values.” Stephen Macedo in Liberal Virtues

The ten commandments are a central tenet of the Christian faith.

But research has revealed that just six of them are still important to British Christians.

Most Christians believe that four of the commandments are not “important principles to live by” according to a YouGov poll.

The four which have fallen by the wayside are the requirement not to worship idols, use the Lord’s name in vain, to worship no other God, and to keep the Sabbath day holy.

Less than one in three Christians believe in preserving Sunday as a day of rest, with 38 per cent against using the Lord’s name in vain and 43 per cent condemning the worshipping of idols.

But most Christians, in common with the general public, still believe that it’s wrong to disobey your father and mother, commit adultery, covet others’ possessions, bear false witness, steal and commit murder.

Stealing and killing were the most widely condemned transgressions, with 94 per cent of Christians and 93 per cent of non-religious people believing those commandments are still important and relevant.

On Tuesday the Archbishop of Canterbury signalled support for a day of rest, tweeting that he was “encouraged” by the Chief Rabbi’s campaign for people to spend time offline over the Sabbath.

While almost half of Catholics said they supported keeping the Sabbath day holy, just 29 per cent of Protestants said they felt the same.

The Bishop of Chelmsford, Stephen Cottrell, said: ” In an age as busy, frantic and feverish as ours I would have thought that keeping the Sabbath, or at the very least observing a balance between work and rest and play was more important than ever.

Sabbath is both a radical idea and a practically useful idea for it simply acknowledges that we need to rest and we need to play. Indeed, it says this is what we are made for.”

He also lamented Christians’ abandonment of the commandment about idolatry, saying: “Whether it is celebrity, wealth, a certain designer label pair of jeans jeans or a make of car, we have all construct a sense of worth in the desire to own and possess certain things that we believe will give value.

“None of it works; or perhaps more accurately we should say it works just enough to get you hooked. Without being warned of the dangers of idolatry, we just become a society of junkies.” Telegraph

Video: Some Commandments Obsolete? | The View
(at 4:20 mark)

During Friday’s episode of the ABC daytime talk show “The View,” a name was censored in a way that was far more offensive than if it had been allowed to be said.

The hosts were discussing a British study that showed that many of the U.K.’s Christian citizens wanted to ignore four of The Ten Commandments, when co-host Paula Faris, a Christian, explained how things were in her house when she was a kid.

“My parents were really strict about what we said in the home. We couldn’t say “Oh my God,” we couldn’t say “JC,” we couldn’t say “(Jesus),” she explained. But the show censored Jesus’s name from the broadcast. BizPacReview

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