US Considering Taking Australian Refugees Housed On Nauru

The Australian government does not resettle illegal migrants in Australia, instead they are processed on the islands of Nauru and sent back home or resettled in Nauru or Papua New Guinea or another country such as Cambodia.

Asylum seekers who attempt to illegally enter Australia by boat will never be allowed back into the country, even if they legally apply for refugee status or come as a tourist decades later.

Australia is currently the only country in the world to mandate the strict detention of illegal migrants and asylum seekers. Anyone entering or found to be in Australia without a valid visa is locked up on the islands of Nauru and Manus.

The new lifetime ban will apply to all adults held in detention centres from July 19, 2013, including those who have chosen to return home. Children will be exempt. BreitBart

The U.S. should not take in questionable asylum seekers that Australia does not want!  This is Ausralia’s problem.

The US has strongly hinted that it has been in discussions with Australia about the possible resettlement of refugees from Nauru to the US.

The Australian last week revealed that refugees on Manus Island and Nauru will be offered permanent new homes in a handful of third countries, which could include northern hemisphere countries such as the US and Canada, as part of a multilateral resettlement deal the Turnbull government hopes to announce by the end of the year.

The resettlement deal would enable it to drastically downsize the processing centres on Manus and Nauru by offering permanent settlement to most of the 1800-odd recognised refugees on Manus and Nauru.

Sources told The Australian the government was in the final ­stages of negotiating the deals, of which several are understood to be in the northern hemisphere, suggesting the US or Canada may be being considered.

In response to questions about whether Australia and the US had held discussions over the issue of refugees on Nauru, the US State Department’s East Asian and ­Pacific Affairs Bureau spokeswoman Connie Paik appeared to confirm that talks had taken place. The Australian

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